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Extreme Pizza Situations

Most people are content with a regularly sized pizza from the local pizza place. But there are others, rich in money and time, who are hellbent on making the acquisition and consumption of pizza mind numbingly and needlessly complicated. And here they are:

Largest Pizza Ever Made

worlds largest pizza Extreme Pizza Situations

On December 8th, 1990, a monumentally wasteful record was set by Pick ‘n’ Pay hypermarket in Johannesburg, South Africa when a pizza measuring 37.4 meters in diameter was, for lack of a better term, constructed. It’s said to have been made using 500 kg of flour, 800 kg of cheese and 900 kg of tomato paste.

Longest Pizza Delivery

airplane pizza Extreme Pizza Situations

Lucy Clough of Domino’s holds the record for longest pizza delivery in history. She took a Dominos vegetarian supreme pizza the distance of 16,950km from Feltham, London to 30 Ramsay Street, Melbourne, Australia, on November 19, 2004. It took 2 days to arrive… which means it was outside the 30 minute window. Yay Free pizza!

Honorary Mention
Bernard Jordaan of Butler’s Pizza had the previous record. He once delivered a pizza from Cape Town, South Africa to Sydney, Australia (What is with these crazy Aussies? Don’t they have pizza in Australia?) The trip totaled 11,042 km (6,861 miles). This had remained the record until Lucy Clough ruined everything.

Most Expensive Pizza

most expensive pizza Extreme Pizza Situations

So we’ve covered the Largest Pizza and the Longest Delivery…how about the Most Expensive? Domenico Crolla created the most expensive pizza which had edible gold, medallions of venison, sunblush-tomato sauce, Scottish smoked salmon, lobster marinated in fine cognac and champagne-soaked caviar. The pizza was sold at auction for charity. It dawned a hefty price tag of $3000.00. Well, if it’s for charity…

Most “Extravagant” Pizza

extravegant pizza Extreme Pizza Situations

If you’re looking for an ‘Extravagant’ pizza then stop by Nino’s Bellissima restaurant in New York. For the modest price of $1000.00 (or $125 a slice) you could get your hands on a 12 inch ‘Luxury Pizza’ with six different kinds of caviar, fresh lobster, chives and crème fraîche, In these tough economic times, opting for a slice might be the more sensible thing to do.

Woman Who Eats Nothing But Pizza

While this woman is clearly insane, it’s still interesting to know just how long one can live consuming nothing but pizza.

Mario Has A Change Of Heart

super mario change heart Mario Has A Change Of Heart

Just wait until he hears that the princess is in another castle…

Russian Wooden Cellphone

Russian Wooden Cellphone Russian Wooden CellphoneIf every country had it’s own type of cellphones, Russian ones could look like this. It could be made of wood – wood is cheap and is available everywhere in Russia, it has simple functions like call and bye, it would be made in Finland cause everyone in Russia knows good phones are made in Finland (like Nokia!) and one additional option is a must – a beer bottle opener from the backside of the phone – very handy!

Wooden Cellphone Russian Wooden Cellphone
Russian Cellphone Russian Wooden Cellphone
Russian Cellphone wood Russian Wooden Cellphone
Wooden Cellphone 2 Russian Wooden Cellphone

Similarities in different Disney cartoons

Well there might be a conspiracy hidden somewhere in here. I’ve seen the subliminal messages in Disney cartoons, and have heard that Disney movies were used for mind control in the MK-ULTRA project.

This video is identical scenes from couple different movies. Maybe it has something to do with repitition, secret codes hidden at the same places in different movies… maybe the filmmakers got lazy and copied the EXACT scene from another movie?!?

Interested in some more???

How to keep an idiot busy [animated gif version]

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how to keep an idiot busy How to keep an idiot busy [animated gif version]

Lifestyles of the Animated and High

When people think of cartoon characters getting high, the conversation always turns to Shaggy of Scooby-Doo. And why not? He talks to a dog. He’s paranoid that he’s being chased by ghosts. He has a perpetual box of Scooby Snacks when the munchies hit.
1 shaggy Lifestyles of the Animated and High

But Shaggy’s not the only animated guy toking up in the back seat of the Mystery Machine. Check out the secret drug addictions of these ten cartoon characters.

Defendant: Yogi Bear

Drug of Choice: Marijuana

2 yogi 220x300 Lifestyles of the Animated and High

Shaggy’s not the only one indulging in a spliff. Perhaps Yogi grows his own in Jellystone National Park. An omnipresent yearning for pic-a-nic baskets and Ranger Smith paranoia are both signs of the pot smoker. Plus his mention that he’s “smarter than the average bear” is a version of the “I swear, I’m not drunk” tell.

Defendant: Underdog

Drug of Choice: Anabolic steroids

3 underdog Lifestyles of the Animated and High

He’s a mild-mannered Shoeshine Boy – until Polly Purebred’s in trouble. Then he pops an “Underdog Super Energy Pill” and he morphs into a canine version of Superman. In the mid-to-late 80s, they edited the pill-popping scenes out. That way no one would know what steroids are!

Defendant: Sherman (of Mr. Peabody and his boy Sherman)

Drug of Choice: LSD

4 sherman 300x200 Lifestyles of the Animated and High

Sherman is “owned” by a “genius dog” named “Mr. Peabody” and takes “trips” in the “WABAC machine” that go “back in time.” ‘Nuff said.

Defendant: Wilma Flintstone & Betty Rubble (of The Flintstones)

Drug of Choice: Valium

5 wilma betty 300x221 Lifestyles of the Animated and High

Wilma and Betty are the cave precursors to Hot Chicks with Douchebags. Although Fred and Barney are less douchey than dopey. The only way that they haven’t gone all Bam-Bam on their men has to be a healthy dose of Mother’s Little Helper.

Defendant: Morocco Mole (of The Secret Squirrel Show.)

Drug of Choice: Hashish

6 moroccomole 282x300 Lifestyles of the Animated and High

He’s from Morocco. He’s got beady eyes. And he wears a fez but no pants?

Defendant: Jem (of Jem and the Holograms)

Drug of Choice: Ecstasy

7 mjem 300x246 Lifestyles of the Animated and High

When her father died, he left her Synergy, a holographic computer designed to be the “ultimate visual entertainment synthesizer.” I’m sure he left her his happy pills, too. Jem single-handedly introduced rave culture to the tween set.

Defendant: Speedy Gonzalez

Drug of Choice: Crank

8 speedy 234x300 Lifestyles of the Animated and High

This one’s pretty obvious. Although I discovered that Speedy, as well as being a speed freak, was also a pimp. Maybe he was chasing his high some 72-hour weekend as well?

Defendant: Elroy Jetson (of The Jetsons)

Drug of Choice: Ritalin

9 elroy 300x238 Lifestyles of the Animated and High

Brilliant. Focused. Straight-A student. Never gets into trouble. With parents like clueless George and perfectionist Jane, this kid’s gotta be on something.

Defendant: Natasha Fatale (of Rocky & Bullwinkle)

Drug of Choice: Diet pills.

10 natasha 300x196 Lifestyles of the Animated and High

She’s a former model and a past Miss Transylvania who’s managed to keep her figure. All before heroin chic!

Defendant: Tom (of Tom & Jerry)

Drug of Choice: Vicodin

11 cartoontom 300x207 Lifestyles of the Animated and HighHe’s been hit on the head with hammers, with frying pans, with baseball bats. He’s been set on fire, drowned, run over, blown up. Like a feline Timex, this housecat takes a licking and keeps on ticking. What’s his secret? I say liberal doses of Vicodin.

What sort of drugs do you think the characters of your favorite cartoons/comics do?

If browsers were women and dudes

If browsers were women

if browsers were women s569x1250 12173 580 If browsers were women and dudes

If your browser was a dude.

Firefox

geeks If browsers were women and dudes

That’s right, of course Firefox is a geek. Not necessarily that much to look at from the outside. But woah there Nelly, once you get those cargo pants off and take a peek under the spongebob squarepants boxershorts this dude is HUNG. And, if you’re into it, he’ll totally do all sorts of nasty s**t that he learned from the 10 years spent jer**ng off exclusively to online and DVD filth. You know, before internet dating actually worked and he could meet a woman from so far outside his social circle she will never find out that in high school the football team made him drink his own urine from the toilet.

Safari

web guy If browsers were women and dudes

The web guy. This is the first man you dated post-college who wasn’t still working at the same lame-a*s job he had in college. That means he had good clothes, clean hair, and some money in the bank – while retaining most, if not all, of his youthful optimism. Sadly, CSS2, Ruby, Ajax and a bunch of other acronyms for s**t you don’t care about has left him robbed of all sex drive, and more perplexing, he seems unable to converse about anything that exists off the internet. Like, not even the weather. Eventually you dump his sorry limp a*s, and go back to dating the guy who still works as a waiter at Ho Jo’s but loves to go down.

Internet Explorer

ebusiness If browsers were women and dudes

If your ex, Web Guy plays his cards right, he may turn into the similarly emasculated, (but hiding it very well) Web Entrepreneur.

In the 90’s these guys were called EB2B specialists, or E-business, but they quickly realized that shit sounded lame. Following four years spent “discovering his strengths”, read: fired from early dot com, subsequently lived in parents basement jer**ng off to online p**n (see geek) which he watched on Internet Explorer – truly this man is a cypher. Anyways, after 4 years in ‘reflection’, out he crawls with sexy stubble and an airtight business model printed on high quality A4.

It’s so easy to hate this guy – with his jargon and his crummy taste in wine, that he thinks is awesome, because he read all about wine on About.com. But the real reason to hate him is that he invented Spouse 2.0. That’s right, co-dependence – reloaded.

Opera

rusty If browsers were women and dudes

Opera is Rusty, the lame scientist dad on the Venture Bros. You want to like Opera, but he’s balding and he’s whiny and he takes to long in the bathroom and when he comes out it really smells. But he pretends like nothing happened in there and proceeds to put his hands on your breasts, and smell your hair deeply.

And all you can think is “Rusty – did you wash your hands after taking that enormous dump?” But rather then asking, you just pack all his stuff for him and leave it in the hall when he comes home from work the next day. He still doesn’t understand why you harshed on him and blames you for the fact that he is so totally socially inept and has bad hygiene.

Chrome

neo1 If browsers were women and dudes

Chrome is Neo. He believes he lives in an elaborate hologram. Need I say more?

Source1, Source2

Earths Facebook Profile

earths facebook profile 1 Earths Facebook Profile

earths facebook profile 2 Earths Facebook Profile

earths facebook profile 3 Earths Facebook Profile

Source: Andrew, College Humor

100w advertising festival

The annual International Advertising Festival 100W (100 watts) is being carried out in Sweden for 18 years now. This year’s opening was scheduled for 27 October. Agency Lowe Brindfors encouraged advertisers to participate, with the help of an advertising campaign “Awarding effective advertising”.

The creative idea is the impact of advertising, which prompted people to buy such goods, which they absolutely do not need – such as blind people have bought LCD TV, and bald – hair dryer.

click on images to enlarge

Stupidest Man Alive…

Leamington man loses $150,000 in Nigerian scam

stupidest man alive world Stupidest Man Alive...


A Leamington man has fallen prey to international scam artists who strung him along for more than a year with the promise of millions in cash, but ultimately bilked him and his family of $150,000.

John Rempel said he quit his truck driving job, lost friends, borrowed money and crossed the globe in pursuit of a non-existent inheritance, after he was contacted by e-mail in what is known as a Nigerian 419 scam.

Rempel said he borrowed $55,000 from an uncle in Mexico and his parents gave him $60,000 on credit to cover fees for transferring $12.8 million into his name.

“They’re in it now because of me,” said Rempel, 22, breaking into sobs. “If it wasn’t for me, nobody would be in this mess. You think things will work out, but it doesn’t. It’s a very bad feeling. I had lots of friends.

“I never get calls anymore from my friends. You know, a bad reputation.”

His troubles began in July 2007. He said he got an e-mail from someone claiming to be a lawyer with a client named David Rempel who died in a 2005 bomb attack in London, England, and left behind $12.8 million.

“They used to come in the mail,” said Leamington police Const. Kevin O’Neil. “Now the majority of these are sent through e-mail. Keeping up with the times, using all the wonderful technology that’s available to them.” [Read more…]

The Secrets Behind Your Favorite Toys

You know the toys. You’ve seen the commercials. But you definitely haven’t heard these stories. Listen up as game inventor Tim Moodie reveals the glorious secrets behind your favorite classic toys.

1. How the Slinky got stuck between a cult and a mid-life crisis

1 slinky The Secrets Behind Your Favorite Toys

In 1943, naval engineer Richard James invented the Slinky. When a spring fell off of his workbench and began to “walk” across the floor, he figured he could make a toy out of it. His wife Betty agreed, and she came up with the name Slinky. Introduced in 1945, Slinky sales soared (say that three times fast), but that wasn’t enough to satisfy Richard James.

By 1960, despite his success, Richard James was suffering from a serious mid-life crisis. But instead of falling for fast cars, dyed hair and liposuction, Richard James went a different route, and became involved with a Bolivian religious cult. He gave generously to the religious order and left his wife, six children and the company to move to Bolivia.

Stuck with the debts left by her husband and a company that desperately needed her leadership, Betty James took over as the head of James Industries. A marketing savant, Betty James was responsible for additions to the Slinky line including Slinky Jr., Plastic Slinky, Slinky Dog, Slinky Pets, Crazy Slinky Eyes and Neon Slinky. It was great for boys and girls around the world that Betty James didn’t suffer a midlife crisis. In 2001, she was inducted into the Toy Industry Hall of Fame, and perhaps even more laudably, her Slinky dog was forever immortalized in Disney’s Toy Story movies.

2. Why Lincoln Logs are the most deceptively named toys in the business

2 lincoln logs The Secrets Behind Your Favorite Toys Standing beside his father (Frank Lloyd Wright) and watching the construction of the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, John Lloyd Wright was inspired. Interlocking beams in the hotel’s basement were designed to handle the little “earthquake problem” that the hotel could encounter. John Lloyd thought, “What if children had a toy version of those beams, shaped like notched tree trunks to build little log homes?”

The architect’s son followed through on his inspiration and the John Lloyd Wright Company manufactured and sold Lincoln Logs from the Merchandise Mart in Chicago. The sets even came with instructions on how to build Uncle Tom’s Cabin as well as Abe Lincoln’s log cabin. The Lincoln Log construction and figure sets came in two sizes available for $2 or $3 dollars.

But here’s the strangest part: the naming of the toy wasn’t a tribute to Honest Abe. It’s a homage to his father. Here’s the scoop: Frank Lloyd Wright was born Frank Lincoln Wright, but he legally changed his name when his parents split. So, Lloyd Jones was his mother’s maiden name and Frank’s name change was to honor her. In any case, whichever Lincoln the toy was honoring, we’re pretty sure Honest Abe would have gotten a kick out of the little logs.

3. Captain Kangaroo saved Play-Doh

3 play doh The Secrets Behind Your Favorite Toys Back before it was Play-Doh, everyone’s favorite squishy clay was actually a wallpaper cleaner used to clean soot off of walls. But when people switched from using coal burning furnaces to oil fueled ones in the ‘40s and ‘50s, demand for the product evaporated. Kutol, a manufacturing company in Cincinnati, was watching their sales dwindle when the son of the company’s founder, Joe McVicker, started looking for ways to turn the business round.

His sister-in-law Kay Zufall suggested using the wallpaper cleaner as a child’s craft item, and McVicker was willing to try anything. He formed a new division, Rainbow Crafts, and began selling the re-branded product as Play-Doh. Sales were okay, but then McVicker came up with a way to sell a whole lot more. He contacted Captain Kangaroo (A.K.A. Bob Keeshan) and offered him 2% of sales if the good Captain would feature Play-Doh on his show. He did. Ding Dong School and Romper Room soon followed suit, hawking the crafty compound to kiddies everywhere and Kutol made plenty of Doh (er, Dough) in the process.

While the company has changed hands a few times since (Rainbow Crafts was purchased by Kenner Toys and Kenner was purchased by Hasbro), that’s hardly impeded sales. More than two billion cans of Play-Doh have been sold since 1955.

4. Etch-a-Sketch used to be played like an Atari

4etch a sketch The Secrets Behind Your Favorite Toys Believe it or not, the original Etch-A-Sketch was operated with a joystick. The invention was the brainchild of Andre Cassagnes, a French electrician tinkering in his garage. Conceived in 1950, the drawing toy made use of a joystick, glass and aluminum powder. Dubbed the Telecran, the toy was renamed L’Ecran Magique, and made its debut at a European Toy Fair in 1959. Fascinated by the invention, American Henry Winzeler, founder and president of the Ohio Art Toy Company, licensed L’Ecran Magique and introduced it to America in 1960.

Amongst Winzeler’s innovations were replacing the joystick with two white knobs in the left and right corners of the screen. The idea was to make the toy look like the hot new adult toy…television.

As for how the knobs work, the two Etch-A-Sketch handles control a stylus that’s attached to strings. The stylus is designed to move up and down and left and right “etching” an image in the Aluminum powder that clings to the glass with static electricity. Amazingly, clever Etch-A-Sketch artists can maneuver the stylus to make what looks like curves and angles creating some spectacular pictures. In fact, the Ohio Art Etch-A-Sketch Gallery actually contains a “Hall of Fame.”

5. Why Trivial Pursuit almost never happened

5 trivial pursuit The Secrets Behind Your Favorite Toys In 1979, Canadians Chris Haney and Scott Abbott (along with business partners Ed Werner and John Haney) decided to create a game that combined their love of all things trivia and their basic competitive nature. Their company, Horn-Abbott, funded the initial production run of 1,000 pieces and sold them to retailers for $15.00 in 1981. At the time, $15.00 was by far the most expensive wholesale price for a board game. But that was a downright bargain when you consider the first pieces cost $75.00 each to manufacture. To the retailer’s surprise the game was a hit even at the heady price of $30.00 at retail.

Realizing that they lacked the funding to bring the game to its full potential, Horn-Abbott licensed Trivial Pursuit to Canadian game manufacturer Chieftain Products. Chieftain had a major hit in Canada in 1981 and contacted their American partner, Selchow and Righter. Amazingly, Selchow and Righter analyzed the game and found that it was: a) too expensive to manufacture, b) it took over an hour to play, c) the best players had to have impressive knowledge of trivial subjects and d) they assumed adults didn’t play board games. Selchow and Righter passed, but Chieftain was persistent and in 1982 the game was introduced to America at the New York Toy Fair.

Initial sales were worrisome. However, through a solid PR campaign and great word of mouth, sales skyrocketed. Sales peaked in 1984 at 20,000,000 games in North America alone. It was the best of times and the worst of times for Selchow and Righter because in 1986, facing huge debt brought on by an abundance of inventory, Selchow and Righter was sold to Coleco. In 1989, Coleco filed for bankruptcy and the rights to Trivial Pursuit were acquired by Parker Brothers. Today Chris Haney and Scott Abbott’s little game has been made into over 30 “Editions.” It’s available in 26 countries, been translated into 17 different languages and has sold approximately 100,000,000 copies since its inception. Not bad for a game that almost wasn’t.

6. Why the guy behind the Erector Set Saved Christmas

gilberterectorrobotset6ya8 The Secrets Behind Your Favorite Toys Because of the market pressures of World War I, the United States Council of National Defense was considering a ban on toy manufacturing. Amazingly, one man’s impassioned speech successfully stopped that from happening.

Alfred Carlton Gilbert was known as “Man Who Saved Christmas.” (There’s even a movie starring Jason Alexander in the title role.) But Gilbert was more than just a gifted orator, he was truly a renaissance man. He was an amateur magician, a trained doctor, an Olympic Gold Medallist (in the pole vault), a famous toy inventor and Co-Founder of the Toy Manufacturers of America. Most famously, however, he was the man behind the Erector Set.

Introduced in 1913 with the catchy name The Mysto Erector Structural Steel Builder, the toy was based on Gilbert’s observation of how power line towers were constructed. The quickly retitled Erector Sets sold well and were limited only by a child’s imagination as to what could be built.

But “The Man Who Saved Christmas” (who also held over 150 patents) wasn’t a one-trick pony. His other inventions included model trains, glass blowing kits (think about the liability today!), chemistry sets (one chemistry set was even designed specifically for girls) and in 1951 (during the cold war) he even introduced a miniature Atomic Energy Lab with three very low-level radioactive sources and a real working Geiger counter. Now there’s a toy even a real patriot could love.

7. How Mr. Potato Head became a political activist

csmphjq1 The Secrets Behind Your Favorite Toys Two very special things about Mr. Potato Head: 1) he was the first toy to be advertised on television, and 2) he was the first toy that featured real produce. That’s right the original toy came as a collection of eyes, ears, noses, a body and accessories that you’d “force” into a real potato. To be fair to Hasbro, Mr. Potato Head’s creator, did include a styrofoam “potato” but it wasn’t much fun.

In 1964 a molded plastic potato body became part of the toy. But back then, Mr. Potato Head also had friends including Carrots, Cucumbers, Oranges, Peppers and a love interest, Mrs. Potato Head. With Brother Spud and Sister Yam there was an entire Potato Head family, and all of the packaging carried the slogan “Lifelike Fruits Or Vegetables To Change Into Funny, Lovable Friends.”

What’s most amazing, however, is that Mr. Potato Head’s appeal has garnered him many “spokespud” gigs.

In the American Cancer Society’s annual “Great American Smokeout” campaign he handed his pipe to then Surgeon General C. Everett Koop and swore off the tobacco, he got up off the couch for the President’s Council on Physical Fitness, and he even pitched in with the League of Women Voters for their “Get Out the Vote” initiative.

Of course, he’s been involved in plenty of straight marketing campaigns, too: in 1997, he shilled for Burger King’s “Try the Fry” introduction of their new French fries.

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